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8 Interesting Facts About Lake Michigan

One of the most popular holiday destinations in the United States is Lake Michigan. It’s one of five Great Lakes in the country and is around 321 miles (517km) long and 118 miles (190 km) wide. It also has a maximum depth of 923 feet (281m). With such a large area and such a long history, many interesting things have occurred at the lake during its life. Let’s look at eight of the most fascinating facts about Lake Michigan. 1. The Earliest People To Inhabit The Lake Were Hopewell Indians During 200 to 500 BCE, the Hopewell Indian culture was at its most successful. The culture used nature to their advantage, living along the river banks and shores of lakes....

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Lake Superior Agate: History, How To Find, Polishing

Photo credit: Lech Darski It is common for people to be astounded by the beautiful Lake Superior Agate rocks. These rocks have deep reds, oranges, and yellows, which give them their unique appearance. While most of these rocks are small, you can get rocks that weigh over twenty pounds. The shape, texture, and appearance of Lake Superior Agates have made this type of stone very popular. Today, we’ll take a closer look at how this rock was created, how to turn it into jewelry, and some of the properties people claim this rock possess. How Did Lake Superior Agate Get Made Let’s start by looking at how these rocks got formed. Billions of years ago, tectonic forces caused plate splits,...

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Leland Blue Stone: Michigan's History & Where To Find One

Are you a treasure hunter who's seeking some of Michigan's unique beach stones? Perhaps, you're walking along the lake with your head down, and you notice a distinctive blue colored rock. You pick it up, pull out your smartphone to help identify the stone, and low and behold you determine this treasure to be a Leland Blue Stone! Now you have a beautiful stone that can be added to your rock collection or used to create Leland Blue jewelry. What is a Leland Blue Stone? Leland Blue Stone is not a stone. It is slag, a by-product of smelting iron ore.  During a short period, time from 1870 to 1885, iron ore was mined in Northern Michigan, and shipped to a...

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What Is A Petoskey Stone? Facts, Legend, & Polishing

A Petoskey Stone is a combination of a rock and a fossil which was living during the Devonian period. After this period, the glacial ice would loosen stones from the bedrock and having ground off their edges and polished them, deposit them on what is now the Northwestern portion of Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. Appearance   Although when these stones are dry, they resemble regular limestone, when they are wet or polished they display a pattern which reveals six-sided coral fossils. In the area as the Petoskey Stones are found, other fossilized corals have been found including some with complete coral colony heads which had been fossilized. The stones are often polished to make uniquely decorated objects such as Petoskey Stone jewelry. The...

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